Disruptive, Impulsive-Control, and Conduct Disorders

 

Learn more about the symptoms of Oppositional Defiant Disorder, Intermittent Explosive Disorder, Conduct Disorder, Pyromania, and Kleptomania.  The most common treatment for these disorders is psychotherapy.


Oppositional Defiant Disorder

  • A pattern of angry and/or irritable mood, argumentative and/or defiant behavior, or vindictiveness lasting at least six months. At least four of the following symptoms is apparent during interaction with a least one person that is not a sibling:
    • Often loses temper.
    • Is often easily annoyed or touchy.
    • Is often resentful and angry.
    • Often annoys others on purpose.
    • Often argues with authority figures (or for children and adolescents, with adults).
    • Often actively defies or refuses to comply with rules or requests from authority figures.
    • Often blames others for his or her misbehaviors or mistakes.
    • Has been vindictive or spiteful at least twice in the past six months.

*For children younger than five years old, the above behavior should occur on most days, for at least six months.  For children five years or older, the behavior should occur at least once per week, for at least six months.

  • The disturbance causes significant distress with the individual or others in his or her family, peer group or work; or it negatively affects social, school, work, or other important areas of functioning.
  • These symptoms cannot be attributed to any other substance, medication, or other medical or mental condition.

Intermittent Explosive Disorder

  • Recurrent behavioral outbursts that exhibit a failure to control aggressive impulses, as evidenced by either of the following:
    • Verbal aggression (such as temper tantrums, verbal arguments or fights) or physical aggression toward property, people or animals, occurring twice weekly, on average for at least three months.
    • Three behavioral outbursts which result in damage or destruction of property and/or physical injury against animals or other people occurring within a twelve month period.
  • The magnitude of aggressiveness during the outbursts is out of proportion to the provocation or to any precipitating psychosocial stressors.
  • The aggressive outbursts are impulsive and/or anger-based and are not committed to achieve some other goal (such as power or intimidation).
  • The aggressive outbursts cause significant distress with the individual or cause impairment in work or social life, or are associated with legal or financial consequences.
  • These symptoms cannot be attributed to any other substance, medication, or other medical or mental condition.

Conduct Disorder

  • A repetitive or persistent pattern of behavior in which the basic rights of others, major social norms, or rules are violated as evidenced by at least three of the following criteria in the past twelve months, and at least one criterion presents in the past six months:
    •  Often bullies, intimidates or threatens others.
    • Often starts physical fights.
    • Has used a weapon that can cause serious physical harm to others (such as a gun, knife, broken bottle, bat or brick).
    • Has been physically cruel to animals.
    • Has been physically cruel to people.
    • Has stolen while being aggressive to a victim.
    • Has forced someone into a sexual activity.
    • Has engaged in fire setting with the intention of causing serious damage.
    • Has deliberately destroyed others’ property
    • Has broken into someone’s house, building or car.
    • Often cons others, such as lying to obtain goods, favors or to avoid obligations.
    • Has stolen significant objects without being aggressive towards the victim.
    • Often stays out at night beginning before age thirteen.
    • Skips school before after age thirteen.
    • Has run away from home overnight at least twice or once without returning for a long period.
  • The symptoms cause significant distress or impairment in work, social or other important areas of functioning.
  • The individual is eighteen years or older and does not meet criteria for antisocial personality disorder.

Pyromania

  • Intentional and purposeful fire setting on more than one occasion.
  •  Feeling tense or aroused before the act.
  •  Attraction to, fascination with, interest in, curiosity about fire, its uses or consequences.
  • Feeling pleasure, satisfaction or relief when setting fires or when witnessing or participating in their aftermath.
  • The fire setting is not done for money, as a political protest, to conceal a crime, to express anger or revenge, to improve one’s living situation, in response to a delusion or hallucination, or as a result of impaired judgement.
  • The fire setting is not better explained by a manic episode, conduct disorder, or antisocial personality disorder.

Kleptomania

  • Recurrent failure to resist impulses to steal objects that are not needed for personal use or for their value.
  • Feeling tense immediately before stealing.
  • Feeling pleasure, satisfaction or relief while stealing.
  • The stealing is not committed to express anger or vengeance and is not in response to a hallucination or a delusion.
  • The stealing is not better explained by a manic episode, conduct disorder, or antisocial personality disorder.
 

The above criteria are adapted from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5).